osprey Osprey Project: Tracking
Osprey Click here to view an interactive map of the ospreys movement!

Adult Females
Osprey We live-captured Osprey F46, a healthy adult female, on May 16, 2006 at a duck blind nest in the Back River located on the Western Shore of the Chesapeake Bay of Virginia. She was fitted with GPS/PTT 66046, USFWS band 788-53959, and auxiliary band purple 27. Osprey F46 began her 31 day southern migration from the Chesapeake Bay on August 29, 2006 and traveled over 3,600 miles. We lost contact with her transmitter on October 31, 2006' her last known location was in South America, Northern Peru.

Osprey We live-captured Osprey F48, a healthy adult female, on May 16, 2006 at a duck blind nest in the Back River located on the Western Shore of the Chesapeake Bay of Virginia. She was fitted with GPS/PTT 66048, USFWS band 788-53961, and auxiliary band purple 29. Osprey F48 began her 29 day migratory journey from the Chesapeake Bay on August 16, 2006 and traveled over 4,200 miles to her South American winter grounds in Monte Alegre, Brazil. This February 2007, Osprey F48 is expected to begin her spring mirgration norhtward to the breeding/summer grounds near Langley AFB.

Osprey We live-captured Osprey F49, a healthy adult female, on May 17, 2006 at a duck blind nest in the Back River located on the Western Shore of the Chesapeake Bay of Virginia. She was originally captured and marked in 2004 (USFWS band 788-53291 and auxiliary band purple 19). In 2006, she was fitted with GPS/PTT 66049. Osprey F49 began her southern migration from the Chesapeake Bay on August 23, 2006 and traveled approximately 2,600 miles. We lost contact with her satellite transmitter on September 17, 2006; her last known location was over the Caribbean Sea.


Adult Males
Osprey We live-captured Osprey M47, a healthy adult male, on May 16, 2006 at a duck blind nest in the Back River located on the Western Shore of the Chesapeake Bay of Virginia. He was fitted with GPS/PTT 66047, USFWS band 788-53960, and auxiliary band purple 28. Osprey 47 began his 19 day migratory journey from the Chesapeake Bay on September 10, 2006 and traveled over 1,350 miles. We lost contact with his transmitter on October 26, 2006; his last known location was in the southern end of Cuba.

Osprey We live-captured Osprey M50, a healthy adult male, on May 17, 2006 at a duck blind nest in the Back River located on the Western Shore of the Chesapeake Bay of Virginia. He was fitted with GPS/PTT 66050, USFWS band 788-53963, and auxiliary band purple 31. Osprey M50 began his migratory journey from the Chesapeake Bay on September 27, 2006 and traveled approximately 2,230 miles. We lost contact with his satellite transmitter on October 17, 2006; his last known location was over the Caribbean Sea.

Osprey We live-captured Osprey M52, a healthy adult male, on May 19, 2006 near the Back River located on the Western Shore of the Chesapeake Bay of Virginia. He was fitted with GPS/PTT 66052, USFWS band 788-53964, and auxiliary band purple 33. Osprey M52 began his 15 day migratory journey from the Chesapeake Bay on September 7, 2006 and traveled over 2,800 miles to his winter grounds in Central Venezuela near the Orinico River.This February 2007, Osprey M52 is expected to begin his spring migration northward to the breeding/summer grounds near Langley AFB.


Juveniles
Osprey We hand caught Osprey J51, a healthy juvenile, from its nest on June 21, 2006 at a duck blind nest in the Back River located on the Western Shore of the Chesapeake Bay of Virginia. This fledgling was fitted with GPS/PTT 66051; USWFS band 788-48273, and auxiliary band green H00. As part of an Osprey population recovery initiative sponsored by the Indiana Division of Natural Resources, Osprey J51 was translocated from the Chesapeake Bay and released at a hack site located at the Jasper-Pulaski Wildlife Area in northwestern Indiana. Osprey J51 began its migratory journey from Indiana on September 7, 2006 and traveled approximately 2,200 miles. We lost contact with his satellite transmitter on October 17, 2006; his last known location was in southern Cuba.

Osprey We hand caught Osprey J53, a healthy juvenile, from its nest located on a duck blind in the Back River located on the Western Shore of the Chesapeake Bay of Virginia on June 21, 2006. This fledgling was fitted with GPS/PTT 66053, USFWS band 788-48273, and auxiliary band green H94. As part of an Osprey population recovery initiative sponsored by the Indiana Division of Natural Resources, Osprey J53 was translocated from the Chesapeake Bay and released at a hack site located at the Minnehaha Wildlife Area in southwestern Indiana. Unfortunately, the satellite transmitter failed approximately 3 days after the bird left the hacking box. The project team successfully recaptured Osprey 53 using a baited carpet-nose trap at the hacking site and recovered the transmitter package.

Osprey We hand caught Osprey J54, a healthy juvenile, from its nest located on a duck blind in the Back River located on the Western Shore of the Chesapeake Bay of Virginia on June 21, 2006. This fledgling was fitted with GPS/PTT 66054, USWFS band 788-53968, and auxiliary band purple 37 and released back into its nest. To our surprise, this young bird decided to travel/migrate north in late July of 2006. Osprey J54 traveled 912 miles to Aroostock County, Maine where the satellite transmitter ceased providing location data on August 20, 2006. The project team assumed that perhaps a mortality event night have occurred and deployed a Wildlife Services recovery team. The remains of J54 and the transmitter package were found in a creek bottom. On-site conditions suggested this Osprey was depredated by an avian predator, most likely a Great-horned Owl. Special thanks to the Maine Wildlife Services for the voluntary recovery effort, specifically Thomas Chase, Robin Dyer, and John McConnell.

Osprey We hand caught Osprey J55, a healthy juvenile, from its nest located on a duck blind in the Back River located on the Western Shore of the Chesapeake Bay of Virginia on June 21, 2006. The fledgling was fitted with GPS/PTT 66055, USWFS band 788-53967, and auxiliary band purple 36 and released back into its nest. Unfortunately, the satellite transmitter failed approximately 2 weeks after deployment. The project team made several attempts to recapture this young bird and recover the satellite transmitter. Although these attempts were unsuccessful, the fledgling was common observed throughout the rest of the summer; the bird appeared to be healthy.

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